Wired In

What a Trump Presidency Could Mean for the Energy Landscape in New England

By Cynthia A. Arcate 14 December, 2016
There is much pondering happening these days about what a Donald Trump presidency will mean for national and regional energy policy, particularly now that former Governor Rick Perry has been named as Secretary of Energy. One thing is clear, however. Certain New England states cannot be sanguine in thinking that they will be able to pursue unfettered their renewable energy and climate strategies to the extent they impact the regional wholesale competitive market. This is most starkly apparent with respect

Energy Storage: Charging Ahead

By Cynthia A. Arcate and Sean Burke 6 October, 2016
Recently, the Massachusetts Department of Energy Resources (DOER) released its long-anticipated report on energy storage, State of Charge. The report forecasts a promising future for the emerging technology, predicting up to 600 megawatts installed in Massachusetts alone by 2025 that could potentially result in $800 million in system benefits to customers. This report sets the stage for next year’s legislative and regulatory session, where rapid storage adoption will surely be on the agenda. It’s been known for some time that

Fulfilling the Promise to Consumers from Large-Scale Clean Energy Procurement

By Sean Burke 15 August, 2016
Every energy bill has the potential to impact costs to consumers, but few have greater potential than the bill just passed by the Massachusetts legislature. In the final hours of the Massachusetts legislative session, conference committee members passed much anticipated legislation providing for massive procurement by the electric distribution companies, National Grid and Eversource, of offshore wind (1,600 MW) and “clean energy generation,” including imported hydro (~1,200 MW). That’s more than four times the capacity of Pilgrim nuclear power plant

New York Shows Us a Path to a Better Future—Reforming the Energy Vision

By Cynthia A. Arcate 14 June, 2016
Over the last two years, the New York Public Service Commission (NYPSC)—which is similar to Massachusetts’s Department of Public Utilities—has been conducting an exercise that contemplates fundamental change in the way electric distribution companies should function, make money and correspondingly be regulated by state government. The effort has been aptly named “Reforming the Energy Vision (REV)” and has been closely watched and debated across the country among many players in the energy world. NYPSC’s recent order (all 170 pages) is